Pictorial Tour of WW&F Historical Engines

Engine #1

E. Sproul collection.
Built Bought Retired Scrapped Weight Builder Builder’s # Wheels
1883 1894 1912 1916 14 tons H. K. Porter 565 0-4-4RT

Notes: This engine was built in 1883, for the Sandy River Railroad as their #3.  It was built as a wood-burner, with a blind (flangeless) rear driver.  On the WW&F, it was converted to coal burning, and the rear driver was re-tired to have flanges.  It was a small engine, prone to frequent derailments, and not well-liked by either railroad.  On the WW&F, it was used during construction of the railroad, and afterward mainly on switching duties in Wiscasset Yard.

Note the angled cylinder and driving rods, which was old and out-dated technology even when it was built.  The engine underwent several changes of cab styles and smoke stacks, before being retired in 1912.

Engine #2

E. Sproul collection.
Built Bought Retired Scrapped Weight Builder Builder’s # Wheels
1894 1894 1933 1937 18 tons Portland Company 626 0-4-4RT

Engine #3

E. Sproul collection.
Built Bought Retired Scrapped Weight Builder Builder’s # Wheels
1894 1894 1932 1937 18 tons Portland Company 627 0-4-4RT

Notes: Favorite engine of the WW&F engineers, especially Earl Keef, who built a model of it after retirement.  #3 ended up being the “Old Faithful” of the fleet, running right up until 1933, even running sporadically after the arrival of #8 and #9.  Its last known run was the morning down train on June 11, 1933.

Engine #4

WW&F Railway Museum collection.
Built Bought Retired Scrapped Weight Builder Builder’s # Wheels
1902 1902 1933 1937 28 tons H. K. Porter 2497 0-4-4RT

Notes: Bought for Franklin Construction Company for construction of the line from Weeks Mills to Winslow, then turned over to the WW&F.  Originally it had a full steel cab, but this was cut back after the Mason’s Wreck and eventually replaced with a wooden cab.  The boiler was set higher than normal on two-foot gauge engines, making it top heavy but an excellent snow fighter.

Engine #5

Walker Transportation Museum collection.
Built Bought Retired Scrapped Weight Builder Builder’s # Wheels
1882 1907 1912 1912 15 tons Hinkley 1564 0-4-4RT

Notes: Built 1882 as for the Bridgton and Saco River Railroad as that road’s #2, and served the B&SR for 25 years.  In 1912 it was retired from a burned crownsheet, but the boiler was continued to be used in the WW&F’s Wiscasset shops (for heating and keeping other engine’s boilers warm) until the railroad ceased operations in 1933.

Engine #6

E. Sproul collection.
Built Bought Retired Scrapped Weight Builder Builder’s # Wheels
1907 1907 1931 1937 26 tons Baldwin 31691 2-6-2

Notes: A powerful freight engine, this was the only engine on the railroad with 6 drivers and outside frame valve gears.  The engine arrived with Stephenson, but later was converted to Southern valve gears.  #6 was retired after being burned in the Wiscasset engine house fire in 1931; she wasn’t greatly damaged but she was never repaired or moved again.

Engine #7

WW&F Railway Museum collection.
Built Bought Retired Scrapped Weight Builder Builder’s # Wheels
1907 1907 1931 1937 28 tons Baldwin 31692 2-4-4RT

Notes: The road’s high-stepping passenger engine.  Retired after being heavily damaged in the Wiscasset engine house fire in 1931.  It sat next to its sister #6, until scrapping in 1937. A reconstruction of this locomotive is one of the goals of the WW&F Railway Museum; boiler fabrication for this engine began in 2017.

Engine #8

E. Sproul collection.
Built Bought Retired Scrapped Weight Builder Builder’s # Wheels
1892 1933 1933 1937 18 tons Portland Company 624 0-4-4RT

Notes: Built 1892 for the Bridgton and Saco River Railroad as their engine #3, then it was sold in 1924 to the Kennebec Central, becoming #3 on that railroad as well.  Frank Winter bought the KC for both this and #4.  It ran for two days on the WW&F, in June 1933, until it derailed in Whitefield on June 15.  It was abandoned there, and later cut up on that spot.

Engine #9

E. Sproul collection.
Built Bought Retired Scrapped Weight Builder Builder’s # Wheels
1891 1933 1933 never 18 tons Portland Company 622 0-4-4RT

Notes: Built in 1891 for the Sandy River Railroad as #5, the “N. B. Beal”, later re-numbered 6 after the Sandy River’s consolidation with the other two-foot railroads in Franklin County.  It was sold in 1923 to the Kennebec Central as their #4.  Frank Winter bought the KC for its two operational engines in early 1933, and it was renumbered to 9.  Nine ran off and on until June 8 that year, when it was sidelined for a broken frame member.  This engine made the final run on the original WW&F in 1934, when engineer Earl Keef ran it to the Top of the Mountain for prospective buyers of the railroad. #9 was sold to Frank Ramsdell in 1937, who kept it in Connecticut, and was later cared for by his daughter, Alice.  #9 returned to home rails in 1995. This engine is now fully restored and is the pride of the WW&F Railway Museum, see this page for details of its rebirth.

#9 is the only surviving locomotive of the original WW&F Railway, the Kennebec Central, and the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes system.

Rebuilding Maine History